Black History Month @ WoW

The global Black Lives Matter protests that characterised our summer were truly inspirational. Black communities and anti-racists across the globe are demanding change. Writing on the Wall are proud to present our programme for Black History month featuring some of the most inspirational local, national and international black artists, creatives and activists, featuring Man Booker Prize winner, Jamaican writer Marlon James and Berkeley Professor Stephen Small; Afrofuturist author and filmmaker Ytasha Womack returns from Chicago to take up residency on the Writing Bloc, and We are also delighted to welcome George DomanToni HickmanKeith Jones and Leroy Moore, US Krip Hop activists and stars of the Netflix documentary Phoenix Rising.


Throwing themselves into the debate around the Decolonization of Curriculums, are Dr Leona Vaughnwhile the 1919 Walking Tours, Mandela 8, the L8 Archive and The Windrush Music projects reveal hidden histories. Sophie Williams will be discussing her new book, How To Be An Anti-Racist Ally, and we see the return of the multi-talented Black Girl Lit Club. Arena Films dig into their archive to present Linton Kwesi Johnson’s A Caribbean Journey, with contemporary discussions and poetic responses from Karen McCarthy-WoolfAshleigh NugentLevi Tafari,  Olive SeniorColin GrantDanielle Boodoo-Fortuné and Vladimir Lucien.


Bringing the struggle home, Kim Johnson MP, Liverpool’s first black MP, and Tracey Gore, the newly appointed chair of the city’s Race Task force, will consider how we level the playing field in Liverpool, while films from WoW’s Time to Breathe writing project portray just how pressing that it is.  Throw children’s Story Time into the mix and there’s something for everyone. We look forward to seeing you throughout October.


As the President of the ‘free world’ dog whistles to white supremacists and in the UK  black people are increasingly targeted by police and far right thugs line our shores to beat back those fleeing war and famine, the most pressing questions now for the Black Lives Matter movement and anti-racists everywhere is ‘What’s Next?’  Throughout  WoW’s Black History Month we will explore this question, and invite you to celebrate great writing and performance and engage in discussion and debate on these vital issues.
 


 

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WoW has played a critical role as one of the longest running writing and literary organisations in the country, in bringing the best of culture from across the country and internationally to audiences throughout the Liverpool City Region. 

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Lockdown Meditation

Emma Jenkins


The tree through the window is still today, except for some of the top branches that look like they’re waving. I say out loud the first of the five main worries, keeping my index finger and thumb pressed together. I compress the worry to nothing. Then I release. I repeat the action and name the second worry. I gradually make my way down to the little finger, until I’ve recited all five of the worries: no more money worry, no more family worry, no more home worry, no more career worry, no more death worry. I fall asleep. When I wake, I find a used envelope. On it I write my expenditure for the month. Incomings and outgoings. If I don’t buy coffee, or books, or lipstick, or rye bread with seeds, or meat, my outgoings will be less than my incomings. The car needs fixing which is less than the coffee, books, lipstick, rye bread with seeds and meat. If I get the car fixed, my outgoings will be be more than my incomings. I can sit and type in my house and write two thousand words a day. My mother might call, which could reduce my daily word count and my incomings. I account for interruptions made by the kids, but not phone calls from my ex. I don’t account for wine. If I buy wine, but not the coffee, books, lipstick, rye bread with seeds and meat, my outgoings will be less than my incomings. I will be able to buy wine. As long as nothing changes.



Emma Jenkins is a writer from Liverpool currently working towards a Writing MA (LJMU). Her creative nonfiction explores current and historical social narratives from the female perspective. 

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